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packaging free toothpaste

I have been searching for the answer to the toothpaste tube conundrum for a while. I know that the packaging free alternatives to toothpaste are endless, for eg; charcoal dust in a jar, homemade bicarb soda paste etc. But ultimately I have faith in the current formula that is recommended by Dentists and I wanted a packaging free option that included fluoride. I can’t find a good source to tell me exactly how many toothpaste tubes go into landfill, but I have created a basic formula to get an estimate below. I’m going to assume that all people in Australia are using toothpaste; According to recommendation, you should use a pea sized blob that is approximately 0.25g. A medium sized tube of toothpaste is 110g which contains 440 pea sized blobs. I know it is recommended that you brush your teeth 3 time a day (!) but I’m going to assume that everyone is only doing that 2 times a day. So by that formula, one tube of toothpaste will last you 220 days, which …

beeswax food wraps

In my pursuit of a plastic-free existence, I have admittedly stumbled upon some pitfalls. Storing food is one of them. While fresh food shopping, I opt for the whole option of fruits and veg (eg. a whole cabbage, rockmelon or cauliflower) to avoid the plastic that half portions come wrapped in. Yay, avoided plastic! But not so great when I get home and I can only consume half a rock melon at once. Believe me, rock melon gets pretty boring, pretty quickly. What to do with half a rockmelon? Chop it up and put it in a tupperware container? – I can look forward to eating another half of a rockmelon in the next 24hrs as it’s definitely going soggy. Cling wrap? – Ultimate plastic fail. Put it face down on a plate and hope for the best? – Questionable. Introducing beeswax food wraps! (Basically cotton, soaked in beeswax.) It’s a literally flexible solution that will save space and fit to any item that you need wrapped. Because it’s covered in wax, all you need is the …

have yourself a sustainable Christmas

As a minimalist amidst this now very commercial holiday called Christmas, your values get well and truly tested. Consumerism takes itself to the next level, offering isles of decorations and nick-nacks that ultimately end up as landfill. Over the years, my eyes have been opened to the harmful and polluting industry of Christmas decoration production. Workers in third-world countries creating endless spray painted santa boots, polystyrene stars covered in glitter, plastic baubles hung from plastic twine. Despite these stories, I don’t like to be the anti-consumer grinch that doesn’t get into to the spirit, so here is a way to be festive without creating waste. How to make a natural wreath: You will need: secateurs, natural twine, scissors and flora 1 / Collect your flora Using secateurs, collect some plant cuttings. Luckily I have a backyard where lots of my neighbours trees and shrubs grow over the fence from which I could collect some good cuttings. I also took a walk to find some trees and shrubs on the street. You can also visit a …

minimalism and cooking – a super easy packaging free vegan lemon cake

This lemony treat serves as a quick and easy dinner party dessert. You can whip it up within the hour, using minimal utensils and all the packaging is recyclable or compostable. No eggs, no milk, this cake truly keeps everyone happy. Vegan Lemon Cake Ingredients 275g Self Raising Flour (buy in a paper bag) 200g Caster Sugar (buy in a paper bag) 1tsp Baking Powder (buy in a cardboard box or tin) Zest of 1 Lemon 100ml coconut oil (buy in a glass jar) 170ml cold water Juice of 1 Lemon Optional Icing 115g Icing Sugar (buy in a paper bag) Zest of 1 Lemon Juice of 1 Lemon Directions Preheat oven to 180C (not fan forced) Line a 23cm round cake tin with baking paper. note; this can be recycled afterward Sift flour into a bowl Add sugar, Baking Powder, zest, coconut oil, cold water and lemon juice. Mix together thoroughly. note; heat coconut oil to a liquid if needed so that it mixes in evenly. Pour mixture into prepared cake tin and place in the …

all natural, eco friendly teeth regime

In our modern lifestyles, there are a lot of daily routines that we have been taught as the best way to maintain our health. Unfortunately a lot of these routines means daily consumption and waste. A prime example of this is our mouth hygiene regime. We are taught to brush at least twice a day and floss once a day, which which involves consuming a lot of plastic. I’m not here to say brushing your teeth is bad, but we can modify the tools we use to keep our teeth and the environment clean. Toothbrush The truth about plastic toothbrushes; Every year, Australians throw out 30 million frazzled sticks of plastic. You can only imagine what that means on a global scale. These toothbrushes are not bio-degradable, and will still be around hundreds of years from now. The Environmental Toothbrush however, has a biodegradable and environmentally sustainable handle and is vegan. Any dentists will tell you, that a manual toothbrush works just as well as an electric one, you just need to know how to brush your teeth properly, so …

To Mum, from Pana with love

What to do when the person you’re buying a present for has everything already? A consumable gift never goes astray. Needles to say, I am a huge advocate for consumable gifting. Not only do non-edible presents clutter up our homes, but when we inevitably discard these items from our lives, they create a lot of long term waste. I love how consumable gifts can also bring people together through sharing, so for Mother’s day, saying thank you with handmade chocolate is not a bad idea. Pana Chocolate, a Melbourne founded business, has mastered the art of guilt-free chocolate. Their chocolate is (take a deep breath) fair trade, raw, organic, handmade, vegan, dairy free, soy free, gluten free and uses no refined sugar. So pretty much anybody on a hipster diet can eat these beauties. Pana Barbounis founded Pana Chocolate in Melbourne, Australia with the intention of creating a rich, luxurious chocolate the whole world could enjoy. A chocolate that made people stop, if only for a moment, to enjoy a myriad sensations: cacao melting on the tongue, surprising …

my week of food shopping packaging free

So this week, I decided to see if I could complete the challenge of shopping packaging free for one whole week! One week may seem like a small feat, but I was astonished at how much of our food consumption is wrapped in plastic, how easy it is to actually avoid it and discovered which industries are notorious for packaged produce. *A note before I begin. During this week, I considered glass, metal and paper to be ‘package free’ as these can be 100% recycled, reused or composted. And so we began.. Planning is Key. Convenience is a killer. I am a routine shopper. I set aside one day on the weekend to buy all of our food for the week. This works to my advantage as pre planning all my meals creates a comprehensive list of items that I will need to buy. Using this list, you can spot items that you know are packaged in plastic, and try and find alternatives to the produce itself, or find other places you can get it unpackaged. Without this pre planning, you’re more …