All posts tagged: plastic free

join the glitterati

Who said you can’t have fun and be eco-conscious at the same time? Sometimes trying to live an eco-friendly life can paint you into a corner. In this early stage of awareness, good alternatives are not always available and it sometimes feels like the sparkle has been taken out of life. So I’m excited to have got a hold of some fun eco-friendly glitter. Glitter, currently made from plastic, has come under scrutiny as the conversation around microplastics has hit an all time high. Microplastics have come under the spotlight after cosmetics using tiny plastic beads in their products were banned in several countries in 2015 onwards, issuing new reforms on plastics used in other industries as well. Plastic production has grown exponentially in recent decades and is predicted to double again by 2025 according to WHO (World Health Organisation). Although microplastics don’t have an impact on human life as yet, the effects on marine wildlife have been staggering and upsetting to say the least. Bioglitter® is the eco-friendly alternative to traditional plastic based glitter. …

beeswax food wraps

In my pursuit of a plastic-free existence, I have admittedly stumbled upon some pitfalls. Storing food is one of them. While fresh food shopping, I opt for the whole option of fruits and veg (eg. a whole cabbage, rockmelon or cauliflower) to avoid the plastic that half portions come wrapped in. Yay, avoided plastic! But not so great when I get home and I can only consume half a rock melon at once. Believe me, rock melon gets pretty boring, pretty quickly. What to do with half a rockmelon? Chop it up and put it in a tupperware container? – I can look forward to eating another half of a rockmelon in the next 24hrs as it’s definitely going soggy. Cling wrap? – Ultimate plastic fail. Put it face down on a plate and hope for the best? – Questionable. Introducing beeswax food wraps! (Basically cotton, soaked in beeswax.) It’s a literally flexible solution that will save space and fit to any item that you need wrapped. Because it’s covered in wax, all you need is the …

your vegan and plastic free minimalist shower routine using only 5 products (v)

Here is everything you need in 5 easy and versatile products and feel good because it’s 100% vegan and plastic free! Body Cleanser: Dr Bronner’s Castile soap bars are biodegradable, fair trade, vegan, cruelty-free and made with organic ingredients. These bars are available in 11 natural fragrances and come wrapped in a pre-recycled packaging, printed with water based inks so it’s compost friendly. Shampoo and Conditioner: These heart shaped bars made by Ethique in New Zealand, are amazing for more reasons that one, but the best thing about this product is that it doesn’t come packed in a plastic bottle. Ethique is a climate neutral, certified BCorp and cruelty-free business, while their products are vegan and biodegradable (including the packaging). These bars are known to last up to six times longer than your usual bottled products due to their concentration, so it’s worth the price tag. #giveupthebottle Face and Body scrub: This scrub is so good you can eat it. Seriously. Get your DIY cap on for this easy-peasy all natural face scrub. Made from …

my week of food shopping packaging free

So this week, I decided to see if I could complete the challenge of shopping packaging free for one whole week! One week may seem like a small feat, but I was astonished at how much of our food consumption is wrapped in plastic, how easy it is to actually avoid it and discovered which industries are notorious for packaged produce. *A note before I begin. During this week, I considered glass, metal and paper to be ‘package free’ as these can be 100% recycled, reused or composted. And so we began.. Planning is Key. Convenience is a killer. I am a routine shopper. I set aside one day on the weekend to buy all of our food for the week. This works to my advantage as pre planning all my meals creates a comprehensive list of items that I will need to buy. Using this list, you can spot items that you know are packaged in plastic, and try and find alternatives to the produce itself, or find other places you can get it unpackaged. Without this pre planning, you’re more …